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zedfast
zedfast

Posted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 4:10pm

Post Subject: new boat

Hello there, I am wondering if anyone could help me with my two part question. My family and I have decided to sell our house and have a 57 by 12 ft widebeam built from scratch. I have been reading articles and forum discussion for months now but still am not sure of the bow thruster. As a new boater with little experience other than holiday rental cruisers should I get a bow thruster fitted or not? We will be spending most of our time at a marina with trips in the summer and weekends so is it worth having one? Secondly, other than the boat how much should I be putting aside for getting on the water and what do I need eg. licence, fuel, insurance etc. If anyone could be of help on these two subjects that would be great. Cheers

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:56pm

Post Subject: new boat

There is not much here to go on so I will assume that you are considering an electric bow-thruster rather than a hydraulic one. The electric models are not particularly powerful and will demand on-going cost in batteries and servicing. There is also a problem about getting effective charging to the battery which will have to be at the front. As someone who stores his bow-thruster on the roof beside plank my view is that they can be useful but very much doubt that they are cost effective. If you will be regularly manoeuvring in a confined marina with strong winds then one will help but I would say it is important not to let its ease of use prevent you developing the skills of handling the boat by engine, pole and ropes. Others will tell you they would not be without one. The license will vary from navigation authority to navigation authority and also if you decide on a Gold one for both BW & EA waters. BW publish all the prices - you will probably find them on Waterscape.com. Insurance for living aboard may be a bit harder to get than leisure insurance because of your valuables aboard so it is bets if you ring around for a few quotes. By far the biggest cost will be the mooring fees and as true residential moorings are as rare as rocking horse dung you are likely to be looking at many thousands - possibly up to £10,000 a year in London (if you can find any). A leisure mooring with a myopic marina operator will cost up to about £5000 a year on the Thames and perhaps £2000 to £3000 year elsewhere. If you went down this route you would have no security of tenure and may be required to move out at a moments notice. Expect to consume between 1 & 2 litres of fuel per hour at canal speed. More going upstream on rives. When the RCD documentation runs out you will need four yearly Boat safety Inspections costing up to £300 a time. Blacking every two to four years will cost around £650 or so. If you go for a two pack blacking with initial sand blasting it will add to the build cost but may not need much more than touching up for between 6 to 10 years. Annual servicing costs will depend on the make of engine but allow £300 to be on the safe side. Some engines require servicing every 100 hours. Then there is the heating cost. The cheapest will probably be by solid fuel stove with back boiler and circulation by gravity, even so I estimate you will be spending between £10 and £20 a week on fuel in the winter. More for gas or diesel fuelled systems. Living on a boat is NOT a cheap option and unless you deliberately flout BW regulations cost as least as much as living in a house. Please think very carefully about this and sort out your mooring before going too far. Tony Brooks PS. useful adds for contacts in the back of the magazine. You should also consider joining the Residential Boat Owners Association. They will give you much good advice.

zedfast
zedfast

Posted: Sun Mar 13, 2011 9:51pm

Post Subject: new boat

Thank-you very much for your response Tony. We have secured a residential mooring at Kings marina in Newark already. As we will not be doing a lot of manouvering I think for we will probably go without a bow thruster then.

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