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melhenson
melhenson

Posted: Sun Apr 06, 2008 10:51am

Post Subject: turning full circle

I've watched many narrowboats turn full circle,allmost in there own lenth, can you please explain how to do this?

boating
boating

Posted: Wed Apr 09, 2008 8:11am

Post Subject: turning full circle

Firstly only use a proper winding hole or a junction of 2 canals. Importantly, as you approach the turning point take into consideration the wind effect - as to whether the wind is going to help the boat to come round or hinder you - hence the name "winding hole". If the winding hole has piling or is a highbank gently turn the boat in and rest the bow against it. Put the boat in forward gear and put the tiller the way you want the stern of the boat to go. Unless it is windy you do not need to use much power.Just before the boat is parallel with the opposite side that the stern is going put the boat into reverse gear with enough power to move the boat stern round. Once moving, reduce the power as the boat moves to astern and change the tiller to the opposite side - this will help the swing you created in forward gear. To continue as you approach the oppsite side of the winding hole straighten the tiller, put the boat into forward gear and move the tiller to the opposite side to bring the bow round to the centre of the canal. If it is windy you may need to use more power and move the tiller from side to side much quicker, but there is no need to use full power - no point in flooding the towpath! If you canot rest the bow against anything on your first turn into the winding hole, all the above will still apply except you should stop the boat going forward before the bow goes aground. Remember, the only way to go fast is to go slow - take your time. Happy turning and boating! Terry.

nbdebdale
nbdebdale

Posted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 6:16pm

Post Subject: turning full circle

Saw this reply and was quite surprised as it's rather different from what I was taught on a RYA Helmsman's course. If you want to spin the boat (obviously the area has to be wide enough!) first come to a halt. Then put the tiller over the 45 degrees, and apply power. The bow will start to turn. When you sense that the boat is beginning to move forward, leave the tiller where it is but change to reverse. The bow will continue moving in the same direction. When the boat also begins to move backwards, change to forward power, again leaving the tiller in the same position. Keep doing the forward/reverse thing until the boat has turned. Keeping the tiller at 45 degrees is the key. It's easy to remember what you're doing, and it works every time.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 9:49pm

Post Subject: turning full circle

As an engineer I would say that what you say is applicable to most planing and semi-planing hulls which use small, highish aspect ratio rudders that have little effect unless the prop wash is flowing over them. They certainly have little effect in reverse. These rudders tend to work a bit like an aircraft wing and "fly" the stern around because the water flow creates a low pressure on one side of the rudder and high pressure on the other. Narrowboats however use low aspect ratio rudders that will also initiate turning by creating more drag to one side of the centreline that the other. Being longer they will also produce more "lift type force" at low water speeds. This is probably why Terry advises to turn the rudder the "other way" as you reverse. It is also worth noting that turning a rudder relying upon the "lift" effect too far will cause it to stall and stop producing a sideways force where as a low aspect ratio rudder will still stall but retain the effect of the offset drag. Tony Brooks

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