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AuthorMessage
Realist
Realist

Posted: Wed Apr 25, 2012 2:04pm

Post Subject: calorifier

I have just had the misfortune of buying a new calorifier after the old one sprang a few leaks round the seam and a leak on the side that looked like a rusty scab ( rust in copper ? ) apart from the cost of the new calorifier I had to pay out for new fittings. The old one had female fittings fittings and the new one needed male fittings, why do they have to mess around with things? then I was told I needed a pressure tank £45 fitted to the hot outlet, if I didn't fit a pressure tank it could invalidate the warranty. I never had a pressure tank before why now? and what purpose does it serve?

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Wed Apr 25, 2012 3:35pm

Post Subject: calorifier

First of all it is not a "pressure tank", from what you say about the warranty I think it is an expansion tank and I also think I know the make of calorifier your fitter bought. I suspect it is in a nice stainless steel case. A calorifier is only an extra strong domestic indirect hot water cylinder but it seems as if at least one make has made a product of reduced strength. All calorifier systems should have a pressure relief valve on the hot water side. This vents as the water inside the calorifier heats up and expands to prevent the calorifier splitting. Normally these are supplied along with the calorifier and are set so there can never be a damaging pressure in the calorifier. However one supplier fits a pressure relief but also says their calorifiers need an additional expansion vessel. The expansion vessel is like a big ball (be it rugby or soccer) thing with a car tyre valve at one end and the water connection in the other. Inside there is a rubber diaphragm with air under pressure at one side and the water on the other. In the case of an expansion tank the air pressure should be set to just about the water pump cut out pressure so in normal use no water can push itself into the tank. However when the calorifier is heated the water expands and is able to push water into the vessel compressing the air. In this way the maximum pressure is reduced. I have never fitted an expansion vessel in over 50 years boating but have fitted an accumulator which looks the same but is pressurised differently. I would never buy a calorifier that specified an expansion vessel or bang goes the warranty. It makes me think the thing would be too flimsy. Tony Brooks

Realist
Realist

Posted: Wed Apr 25, 2012 3:46pm

Post Subject: calorifier

Thanks Tony, you are quite right it is an expansion tank,the words EXPANSION TANK on the box should have given me a clue, I will wake up soon, thanks again. GB.

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