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Juliemark
Juliemark

Posted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 4:14pm

Post Subject: Ballast

Hello I have just purchased a 65ft x12ft Dutch barge style shell with no engine, I was wandering how much ballast this will need in tonne and what is the best type, the boat will need to be lowered approx an extra 2ft into the water. My boat is currently I dry dock so do not want to just guess?

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Sun Nov 04, 2012 5:14pm

Post Subject: Ballast

I am not sure that I can answer that question because you give little indication of the hull's cross section and also the size of the various tanks and how full they are when you decided the draught had to increase by 2 ft. If this was a narrowboat with an almost rectangular cross section we would measure the beam, the front and rear swims, and the length of the straight bit in the middle. All in metres. Then multiply the beam by the length of the straight bit and then by the 2ft but as a fraction of a metre. Next do the same for the front and rear sections but halve the result. Now add the three results together. this tells you how many meters cubed of water you have to displace. 1 cubic meter of fresh water weighs around 1 tonne so that gives you the answer. However it will not tell you where to place it and your water and fuel tanks may well mean more of it has to go in one palace to counteract the weight of the tank. However you will need to subtract the weight of the engine and all your internal fitout & furniture. Tony Brooks

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 7:48am

Post Subject: Ballast

I assumed that the hull had been afloat and the 2 ft was an increase in draught. If the boat has never been afloat and you want a 2 ft draught you need to subtract the weight of the hull from the calculations. The best type is the densest that absorbs the least water and at the same time does not react with the hull so we start with lead that is isolated from the hull, then scrap steel/cast iron, then engineering bricks and finally what many people use which are paving slabs. It is best to arrange a small air gap between the hull and ballast so on a flat bottomed boat the ballast will often be stood on length of scrap household electrical cable sheathing, floor tile spacers or anything else that does not rust or rot. Tony Brooks PS are you aware of the RCD regulations?

Juliemark
Juliemark

Posted: Mon Nov 05, 2012 10:13pm

Post Subject: Ballast

Hello yes it has been afloat, it will not be driven either so need an extra 2 ft draft, no I am not aware of any regulations how does this affect it?

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 7:15am

Post Subject: Ballast

Since about 1997 any new boat placed on the EU market is required to comply with the Recreational Craft Directive. If it does not then selling it within the EU is an offence and there have been prosecutions. There is an exemption for "self built" or "self fitout" boats but they have can not be sold on until 5 years have elapsed from completion. As you gave so little detail I have no idea if your hull is new or not. Hampshire County Council had a lot of RCD information on their website. Even if the RCD will not apply to your boat if you moor it on virtually any inland navigations authority's waters it will have to comply with the the Boat Safety Scheme and be inspected before you can license it. If the hull is older than about 20 years (depending upon insurance company) you will probably have to have the hull surveyed every 5 years. Tony Brooks

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Tue Nov 06, 2012 7:15am

Post Subject: Ballast

Since about 1997 any new boat placed on the EU market is required to comply with the Recreational Craft Directive. If it does not then selling it within the EU is an offence and there have been prosecutions. There is an exemption for "self built" or "self fitout" boats but they have can not be sold on until 5 years have elapsed from completion. As you gave so little detail I have no idea if your hull is new or not. Hampshire County Council had a lot of RCD information on their website. Even if the RCD will not apply to your boat if you moor it on virtually any inland navigations authority's waters it will have to comply with the the Boat Safety Scheme and be inspected before you can license it. If the hull is older than about 20 years (depending upon insurance company) you will probably have to have the hull surveyed every 5 years. Tony Brooks

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