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SqueezeBox
SqueezeBox

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 8:03am

Post Subject: Engine Bay Breathing

Hi, Earlier this year we had new, very snug fitting, deck boards fitted. Two boatyards have suggested that we need to vent the engine bay. The most recent because of the amount of condensation the bay accumulated when left for two months, (we have ruled out stern gland and rain). The boat is a 2000 Durham Steel Craft cruiser stern. There are no vents at, all that I can see. I am loath to reduce the freeboard by putting the recommended louver vents in the hull side. Can you suggest any suitable deck fittings, there is space beneath the seat (plank) across the stern for deck fittings that would not get kicked or foul anything. Or perhaps you can offer another solution. Many thanks in anticipation. Chris

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 8:52am

Post Subject: Engine Bay Breathing

Even if we ignore the condensation aspect it is still vital that the engine bay has adequate venting to provide the engine with enough fresh, cool air. a 1500cc engine running at 1500 rpm demands close to 1000 litres of air a minute. If it does not get that then you risk a smoky exhaust and excess carbon build up in the engine, quite apart from a loss of power. However I have doubts that increasing ventilation will make a significant impact on the condensation during the winter. I think the best you can do is to keep the bilge and engine tray free of water. If you think condensation is causing a build up of water in the bilge you need to make sure it is not rain water overwhelming any self draining features. Now, at last, back to your question. I agree about the loss of freeboard and I do have an idea or two but first need to see a photos of the cockpit area. Please email any photos you have that to Tony@TB-Training.co.uk. Regrettably the forum can not deal with images in sufficient detail. Tony Brooks

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 11:01am

Post Subject: Engine Bay Breathing

Copy fo reply sent direct to Chris :- You already have one vent on the outside of the control lever housing, although I would have fitted a larger one on the inside where rain would be less likely to enter. I think that you will find that the boat used to have more engine bay breathers but someone decided to blank them off. The yellow arrow on the attached image indicates a steel patch welded onto the cockpit upstand. This is where I would expect to find a simple vent hole. In fact vents can be placed anywhere around the upstand apart from where the fuel tank is and they should all vent into the engine bay. On my boat there is one on each side and they consist of two slots about half an inch wide and about 5 inches long separated by a half inch of the upstand. You may not find it easy to cut such slots so you could use a large hole saw (slow drill speed and plenty of cutting lubricant) to cut series of round holes and cover them with brass louver vents similar to what you may well have on your doors. I would drill and tap holes for the securing screws but you could use poprivets or maybe even an exterior "nonails". Example - http://www.midlandchandlers.co.uk/Products/Venti lation/LouvreVents/AV014.aspx I would be looking at one on each side but if you are concerned about things getting caught on it you should keep them behind the boarding areas. Apply some sealer to the backs of the vents if you use them to help stop rain trickling between the steel and the vent and the dripping inside the engine bay. I reply that I am far from convinced that venting will cure the problem. The underside of my boat's steelwork and engine boards run with condensation during the winter but it is minimised by keeping the bilge dry. Tony Brooks

SqueezeBox
SqueezeBox

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 11:25am

Post Subject: Engine Bay Breathing

Tony Very many thanks, your advice and comments are very helpful and reassuring. We will add ventilation to the upstand and hope that it will help the water; it can do nothing but improve the engine performance.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Thu Dec 06, 2012 11:56am

Post Subject: Engine Bay Breathing

PS - would your little photo show a navigation perch on the Ribble? If so can you help the questioner below this one. Cheers TB

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