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Terry1948
Terry1948

Posted: Fri Aug 02, 2013 1:51pm

Post Subject: Wet Rot

Some years ago we came back to our boat after the winter and began to fill the water tank, unfortunately it seems that mice had used it as their winter retreat and had gnawed through a water pipe under the sink unit (couldn't have been in a more inaccessible place!) and consequently gallons of water poured into the galley. We mopped up and dried as best we could and then several months later I decided to put down laminate flooring in the galley (big mistake). Earlier this year I had to take up the laminate as the marine ply flooring completely rotted due to wet rot. I have removed as much of the flooring that I can up to the bulkheads and intend to re-floor using floorboards (hardwood or reclaimed flooring) and leave them open as a feature. My question is: what is the best way to treat the existing marine ply for wet rot and also pre-treating the new flooring? Thanks.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Fri Aug 02, 2013 2:13pm

Post Subject: Wet Rot

To start with, and its no help to you now. If you had made sure the under cabin bilge was free of water and left the inspection hatch (if you have one) open to ventilate the bilge this may never have happened. If you do not have a cabin bilge inspection hatch (often at the back of the cabin in a cupboard or under the rear steps) then my advice is to cut one. It is also a great help if you can ensure through bilge ventilation. My boat is far from perfect in this respect but it does have a lifting hole in the access hatch and two x 50mm holes under the ridge. I suspect you have water in your bilge because it is very hard to believe anyone would fit laminate onto a wet floor so the damp you now have is probably condensation from water in the bilge. If it really is wet rot and not dry rot (dry rot needs dampness) then ensuring the bilge is always dry and ventilated should suffice. As wet rot and dry rot are often mistaken I feel you would be advised to apply a solvent based rot treatment. For more info see: http://www.aviva.co.uk/help-and-advice/home-advi ce/useful-articles/how-to-deal-with-dry-rot-and- wet-rot.html (all on one line). Tony Brooks

Terry1948
Terry1948

Posted: Fri Aug 02, 2013 3:24pm

Post Subject: Wet Rot

Thanks Tony, yes we did wait until everything was dry, at least 6 months after the event and we do have an under cabin bilge inspection access at the stern which had been wet but is now dry since I found where the water was coming from, and has been for several years. The ballast in our boat is bricks, flat side uppermost, I lifted a few out when I exposed them and there were signs of water droplets beneath the recess in the laid down side of the brick. It is in fact wet rot with the classic ‘tentacles’ being present, I also had it confirmed by a building infestation contractor. I will have a look at the link ... thanks again. Terry

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