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holman
holman

Posted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 12:12pm

Post Subject: Stove Flue Sealing

Hi Tony, The seal on my solid fuel stove needs replacing on the join between the stove and the flue. Advise from a chandler was to use a high temp (300C max)silicone sealer. Will this be OK or should I use a cement paste (1250C) ? Many thanks Ray Holman

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 1:22pm

Post Subject: Stove Flue Sealing

Its funny that you should ask that because I spent most of yesterday digging out the old sealing, removing the flue, changing the stove chimney collar and sealing it all. Now, with things like stove flue sealing which have the potential to kill with CO poisoning MUST refer you to your stove manufacturer for such advice. If I gave you a definitive recommendation and the worst happened myself and the magazine could find ourselves in court. However to help you make an informed decision I will tell you what I used and why. This goes for both the stove collar to flue seal and the roof flange to flue seal. In both cases I packed the bottom of the joint with 10mm glass fiber rope with a view to making a gas tight seal that still allowed for a degree of compression that may be caused by the expansion and contraction or rusting in the joint. I then used black Plumbaflue 300 degree silicon from Screwfix to seal the joints. I used the same method six or more years ago when I installed the stove. I checked the last installation several times over the years with a digital CO meter and no leaks were apparent. Such silicon allows up to 25% expansion which a "cement" material will not. It also allows a for degree of compression such as when rust develops within the joint. You will also find that the flue pipe expands its length noticeably when you are running the stove. The silicon allows this to happen while maintaining the seal. A cement based material may not and it could result in a cracked stove top. The reason my collar cracked was because I used asbestos bandage to make the initial seal and it did not allow for expansion cause by rust. The actual seals were still in good order when I dug them out. Once again I must ask you to get a definitive recommendation from your stove supplier. Tony Brooks

holman
holman

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2014 4:17pm

Post Subject: Stove Flue Sealing

Hi Tony, Many thanks for the information given on how you have sealed your stove, I have now done the same and it all looks good. Also thank you for the information you gave to me last year regarding the re setting of the tappets on my BD3 engine, it now sounds as it should. Ray Holman

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