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dixster
dixster

Posted: Sun Jul 13, 2008 8:56pm

Post Subject: Deck

I need to replace the deck on my cruiser. What would you suggest as a good non slip soundproofed material.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 6:22pm

Post Subject: Deck

I am not sure what you mean by this. Please tell me what sort of boat it is, which deck you are talking about and why a deck needs sound proofing. I suspect we are talking about the engine covers on a cruiser stern narrowboat, but that is not a "cruiser". Tony Brooks

dixster
dixster

Posted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 9:31pm

Post Subject: Deck

Hello Tony, Yes, you are completely correct - we are talking about the engine covers on a cruiser stern narrowboat. Sorry for misleading with incorrect terms.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Tue Jul 15, 2008 9:00am

Post Subject: Deck

Dear Richard Thank you for clarifying that. I am afraid we have a problem across a lot of questions with people failing to give sufficient details to allow me to provide a full answer. My request for more info was intended to try to educate ALL the users and not just you. We need to split the answer into two because it is not normal to use deck boards as a means of sound insulation. The board normally used is called Hexagrip (see -http://www.canalworld.net/forums/index.php?show topic=11907&mode=threaded - all one line, no hyphens). This is the ply type board used for truck floors that has a textured laminate on one side and a non-textured one on the other. The link lists some suppliers but I am sure some chandlers and boat builders can also supply it. If you have a local company building truck bodies they may supply off cuts. It is vital that you take time to protect the cut edges so water can not penetrate the plies. If Hexagrip is too expensive then the best quality WBP ply you can find will also do. Take care with the cheap shuttering ply that has big voids inside it. I think you need a minimum thickness of 12mm, depending upon the span required, however from the sound point of view the thicker the better. Treat the cut edges. Traditionally canvas was stuck to the board and kept well painted, but I doubt its durability. You can use sanded paint or something like Protectacote to give a non-slip finish. You could stick vinyl floor covering to it or one of the expensive âfalse teak deckâ products, but these tend to be expensive. Now the soundproofing. As long as the engine room is well vented and is not relying on the gaps between/below the boards to provide air for the engine stick some strips of closed cell neoprene to the underside of the boards where they seat on the bearers. This may well produce a satisfactory result by preventing sound leaking out of the gaps. If you want to go further then it becomes expensive because all the hard surfaces in the engine room need covering with a sound insulation material. This âtrapsâ the sound and prevents it bouncing off the hard surfaces and resonating. Because of the high cost of the material I made a thick plywood box, adequately vented, with baffles on the vents, to surround the engine and soundproofed that. All the major chandlers will sell soundproofing. This is normally plastic foam to trap the sound and a high-density layer to deaden the sound. Unfortunately much of it has a vulnerable outer surface that is easily damaged. I chose (and paid for) a product from T W Marine that uses a white fabric cover that gives it strength and wipes ânearly cleanâ. T W Marine also supplies instructions about the baffled vents etc. The material is available in both self-adhesive and stick-on versions and a variety of thickness. I would advise caution if you are contemplating a very thin product that claims both thermal and noise insulation. I have not seen a proper comparative test of this product and so far can not see how science accords with the claims. Having done all that you may well find the exhaust noise intrusive so you may be going on to fit a hospital silencer, then you get shaft rumble and vibrations through the hull so another shaft coupling is required, and so on. My advice would be to approach soundproofing with care because it can get very expensive. You might even find some polypropylene carpet over the boards will produce an acceptabeb level of soundproofing. Tony Brooks

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