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TrevorW1
TrevorW1

Posted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 5:58pm

Post Subject: Measuring a boat

Hi, We bought a 57' narrowboat last year as new boaters. We went for that length as we plan to cruise a lot over the next few years. We didn't see the survey until after we'd bought the boat (yes, I know, but everyone who knows him said the dealer involved was as honest as the day is long so no need to worry about anything etc..) but when we did finaly get a copy it states the boat is 58', ok, we can live with it, it'll be a bit tight in some of our Northern locks but do-able. Following a discussion with another boater on our marina yesterday who said it looks more like a 60' to him, we got out the tape measure and measured it to 59' 10"! So, my question is where exactly do you measure the length of a boat? We went from the tip of the bow to the end of the steel extension on the stern, sort of along the gunwales. However, the curve of the bow will change the length if you normally measure along the waterline, or indeed, lower. Do we include the fender on the back (apparently it was put on by the previous owner to protect the rudder)? My instinct was to measure it at the top as that'll be the bit that has to fit between the lock gates. Any advice (apart from next time get the survey first and don't trust anybody!) would be greatly appreciated.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:36pm

Post Subject: Measuring a boat

There are a number of different "lengths" used for boats. Waterline length is used in prop & speed calculations. CaRT licensing require the total length INCLUDING fenders. For purposes of the northern waterways I suppose that you need the length excluding any fenders that you can lift because you can always push the rudder over to one side when in tight locks. I would raise the fenders and then clamp a length of timber to the roof overhang at the front and back. Then use a plumb line tied to each length of timber so the strings line up with the furthest forward and furthest back part of the hull/fixed fender. Mark where the string lies across the timber and measure the distance between the marks along the roof. The plumb lines (being at the front and back) will automatically compensate for the fore - aft trim of the boat. I believe that despite what CaRT say a 60ft NARROW boat can navigate the northern canals but in one place you may have to descend a lock backwards. I have heard that full length narrowboats have traversed the wide canals up there but can only pass through the wide locks singly and dioagonally across the locks Tony Brooks

TrevorW1
TrevorW1

Posted: Tue Apr 01, 2014 3:58pm

Post Subject: Measuring a boat

Thanks Tony. I saw a post about measuring the beam the same way so I did wonder if it would work for length too. I've heard that 60' boats can get across all of the Northern canals too - we'll find out later this month. Trevor

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