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Joebraitch
Joebraitch

Posted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 11:00am

Post Subject: Tiller vibration

I have a 2004 Liverpool Boats 56' semi trad which is in good overall condition with about 1000 hours use. It is now kept on the Thames. The tiller vibrates badly at normal speed and water surges up through the top bearing at speed or full lock. The tiller post is also sloppy in the Skeg pedastal bearing (seen at recent survey). How can I sleeve the pedastal bearing and replace the top bearing without taking the boat out of the water? How does the swan neck fit to the tiller post as there is no nut showing? I want to

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Tue Jun 03, 2014 5:20pm

Post Subject: Tiller vibration

The most likely answer is you can't unless you are a diver. Typically Liverpool Boats fabricated the rudder stock and swan neck out of one piece of steel. They slot the lower portion of the rudder post so the rudder plate slots through it. The plate is retained by three bolts, one of which seems to clamp the plate. It is far from uncommon for the bolts to work loose so the plate slops about in the stock. To remove the stock the plate is removed and the whole swan neck/stock assembly lifted out upwards. This assumes it is of typical LB design but they have been building boats for so long there may be variations. To be sure one would need to inspect the boat and possibly feel the rudder stock for the nuts/bolts via the weed hatch. Tony Brooks

Joebraitch
Joebraitch

Posted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 9:13am

Post Subject: Tiller vibration

Tony I can confirm that the tiller plate is slotted through the tiller bar and secured with bolts. I assume this means removing the plate to allow the tiller stock to be lifted out?

Tiller vibration
Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 11:08am

Post Subject: Tiller vibration

Yes - "To remove the stock the plate is removed and the whole swan neck/stock assembly lifted out upwards".

Joebraitch
Joebraitch

Posted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 2:15pm

Post Subject: Tiller vibration

Can I lift the tiller and swan neck enough to insert a brass packing sleeve in the Skeg pedastal bearing, and around the tiller stock to take up the slack. I would then fit a SS. Jubilee clip above the brass sleeve to stop it rising on the tiller stock - would this work as a temporary measure until the boat comes out for blacking next year?

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Thu Jun 05, 2014 5:45pm

Post Subject: Tiller vibration

Regrettably I can not answer that question because I do not know your boat in detail. If you want to do that I would have thought that it would be very difficult to all but impossible with the boat in the water. The wear in the lower bearing is unlikely to be symmetrical so it is unlikely to be a case of pushing some shim stock into the gap. You will probably have to measure the gap and then machine something. It would be easier to egt the boat out and cut the lower bearing off. Then file/grind the bottom of the stock as round as possible, and turn up an new lower bearing to fit and weld it on. It is absolutely normal for water to gush up ordinary "no seal ball bearings on full lock and at high throttle openings. There are several ways to minimize it. One is to cut large split "washers" from something like car tyre side wall to fit around the stock and up the rudder tube. Some people make up a flange with a short length of "tube" on the bottom. This is split, placed around the rudder stock just below the hull and secured with a hose clip. To try to give you a better answer to your last question. If the gap between the top of the rudder blade and hull is larger than the distance you need to lift the stock the you will be able to lift it. If it is less then the stock will not lift clear of the lower bearing. Also be aware that excess rudder vibration can also be caused bu trying to drive the boat too fast for the water you are on but this is less likely on the Thames unless you are above Oxford. Tony Brooks

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