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AuthorMessage
Mogman
Mogman

Posted: Thu Feb 11, 2016 4:51pm

Post Subject: Tiller shape

Is there a mechanical or ergonomic advantage to the Swan Neck shape?

Tiller shape
Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Thu Feb 11, 2016 6:31pm

Post Subject: Tiller shape

The rudder stock itself is often sloped backwards towards the top give a degree of "self centring" action but that doe snot explain the typical swan neck shape. On a trad style boat the steerer should stand in the roof hatch to steer. TO allow this the tiller bar has to be long enough to reach in front of the rear bulkhead but that will impede access to the rear steps so normally the tiller bar is either pivoted so it can swing up and over or it is made removable. Either solution would be difficult to achieve if the "swan neck" ran straight up form the rudder stock and then turned through a bit over a right angle. The gap between rear bulkhead and rudder stock would be too small. By sweeping the "upright part of the "swan neck" backwards and the making the bend gives enough length for the unpivoted section or the part the separate tiller bar fits over yet keeps much of the small rear deck free of obstruction. On butty boats where the equivalent of the "upright" part of the swan neck is just an extension of the rudder the whole tiller bar lifts out of the rudder and is replaced the other way up so the bar sweeps upwards to clear the rear access. You can occasionally see a "swan neck" that is vertical with a right angle bend but they look very odd.

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