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barrowPete
barrowPete

Posted: Fri Aug 12, 2016 1:25pm

Post Subject: bleading a listers fuel lines

Deep in the bowels of my narrow boat sits a Lister two cylinder is there a sure way to blead the fuel lines The works the manual says release the compression and turn over the engine. Open each point until all the air is out then close the compression and start the engine. I get clean fuel past the the first filter through the lift pump to the ingoing side of the small filter fuel but do not see no air coming out of the far side of the filter. This all done upside down with feel and mirrors! I cannot see a lever on the Lift pump.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Fri Aug 12, 2016 4:56pm

Post Subject: bleading a listers fuel lines

Please identify the engine model or email a photo to Tony@tb-training.co.uk so I can identify it. The lack of a priming lever on the pump sounds very strange to me. I think that I have seen the odd more modern Lister with a diaphragm type priming pump on the top of the engine but those had large fuel filters.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Sat Aug 13, 2016 12:31pm

Post Subject: bleading a listers fuel lines

I had hoped for an engine identity so I could be sure about what we are dealing with. There are many Lister models available in a variety of sizes. From your description of the fuel filter as being small am going to assume that it is one of the Sx range of engines and as you have access problems I think air ducts may be getting in the way indicating it is air cooled. This answer is based on that. First of all over the years many small Listers in boats have been conversions from industrial engines that may well have been gravity fed from a tank mounted on the engine. If yours was one of these the lift pump could be anything, possibly a petrol one with no priming lever. Without a priming lever I am afraid that you need to rely upon a well charged battery for cranking or a strong friend for the starting handle. On most narrowboats the tank is high enough so that with a full tank of fuel you get a degree of gravity feed so once the system is fairly full of fuel gravity might be enough. If you can get fuel out of the inlet bleed screw on the small filter but no fuel or air from the outlet side that indicates a blocked filter or drilling in the filter head. I assume that you have changed the filter element inside. Be aware that it will take a degree of time to fill that filter with fuel so unless you cover the bleed screw with spit you may not see air coming from the bleed screw. That just about covers your direct question but even when you get fuel from the outlet bleed screw you may have another problem. Some of those engines are equipped to be self bleeding and some are not. You can not tell unless to take the rocker covers off and carefully inspect the injector leak off pipes. If it is self bleeding you should see a think copper pipe dropping down from the leak off pipe into the depths of the engine. However even if you do see this the pipes may have been cut off and sealed in the past. If its is not self bleeding you will have to take the injector pump side cover off the engine to gain access to the bleed screws that are about half way up each injector pump and pointing slightly upwards. If the bleed screws go through banjos on the thin pipes referred to above the engine should be self bleeding. If not pack the area around the pumps with rag to absorb spilt fuel and loosen each screw. Then do whatever you have to until pure fuel flows from the bleed screws. Tighten the screws and remove the rag. Now take the rocker cover off and identify the LARGE union nut on the injectors. Pack the area with rag, loosen the large nuts one turn and spin the engine on the starter until fuel spits or drips out of the loose unions. Tighten the nuts and try to start the engine. If it starts all well and good so replace the side cover and rocker covers. If it does not and you only have a few wisps of exhaust smoke try bleeding it again. If you have clouds of white smoke the fuel system is OK, you have another problem preventing it from starting.

barrowPete
barrowPete

Posted: Sat Aug 13, 2016 2:14pm

Post Subject: bleading a listers fuel lines

Thank you a throw away remark about the lift pump lever Gave me the idea I must have one. Using a selfie stick I was able to see under the lift pump and find the dam thing 5 mins later I have a sweet running engine. Thanks again, it was a Lister LPWS 2 with what looks like a Pienne/corona pump

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Sat Aug 13, 2016 3:01pm

Post Subject: bleading a listers fuel lines

I am all but certain that that engine is self bleeding so as long as you have a well charged battery to sustain cranking it probably does not need a priming lever. However by priming the whole system to the filter outlet you will greatly reduce the cranking time and thus wear on the battery and starter. I am pleased its sorted.

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