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susiepeart
susiepeart

Posted: Fri Sep 12, 2008 10:02pm

Post Subject: Multifuel stoves

Following your article in the latest edition, I have just been to see the "Boatmans stoves" dealer, Eddie. I like the look of the stove, but am concerned about the size of it. I currently have an (old, very cracked) morso squirrel, which I plan to replace. I think it has a comparable kW output (4), but the capacity inside seems much smaller. How much difference will I experience in heat with this capacity? (It seems to have about the half the "volume" inside the firebox.) Also, what difference will I experience with it being steel instead of cast iron? Any help appreciated!

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Sat Sep 13, 2008 6:00pm

Post Subject: Multifuel stoves

Dear Susie, To be honest I think most stoves are too large for a narrowboat, I know I spend winter days and evenings with the doors open because my 3kW stove gets the boat too hot. I can not gainsay the maker's if they claim it produces 4kW so without direct experience I can not answer the the heat question. It may be that you need to run the fire harder/hotter to produce the quoted output, but with the smaller firebox the consumption should (in theory) be similar. A cast stove may well crack if allowed to heat up too fast but a steel stove will not do this. A steel stove may distort if it overheats and may "burn away" if the fire touches the steel. Cast iron tends to resist deep rusting, but steel will allow rust to penetrate so it is vital to keep rain out of a steel stove's chimney and also ensure some draught up the chimney even when the fire is not in use. I have just thought - did you look at a stove with a back boiler fitted because they can make the inside look smaller. Tony Brooks

susiepeart
susiepeart

Posted: Mon Sep 15, 2008 7:10pm

Post Subject: Multifuel stoves

Thanks Tony. I just looked at a standard stov, no back boiler. It's dimensions are 18ins height, 14 ins wide and 12 ins deep. Pretty small I reckon. I'm having a new collar, flue and chimney base plate fitted too - will this be sufficient to keep the rain/damp out of it? Being steel, are you saying that I should put a cover on the chimney when not in use, or a "chinamans hat" type cover? Susie

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Tue Sep 16, 2008 8:13am

Post Subject: Multifuel stoves

Use the longest chimney you can, maybe you will need a shorter cruising one and a longer static one. The length helps to increase draw. I drilled some ventilation holes in the side of an old saucepan which is ideal for keeping rain out when the stove is not in use. Its cheap and replaceable when it inevitably gets knocked off. The Chinaman's hat is probably better suited to use when the fire is low but the rain is pouring down. I use mine all the time the fire is alight. Tony Brooks

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