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paganman
paganman

Posted: Thu Sep 18, 2008 3:09pm

Post Subject: Listing

My boat has a list to starboard,not a huge one but enough to be annoying. There don't seem to be any inspecton hatches down to the bilge. How can i correct this?

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Thu Sep 18, 2008 7:55pm

Post Subject: Listing

Dear Ivan, so your boat of unspecified type, no info on water & fuel tank placement and no info on toilet type has a list to starboard. To be honest I am unable to be much help unless you tell me a lot more about the boat. Wide beam inland cruisers often have their water & fuel tanks at the side of the boat, most narrow boats do not. If it has tanks at the side then ensure the port one is kept full and the starboard ones is only half full. However I suspect that you are talking about a narrow boat which normally has tanks across the bow & sterns. In this case the first thing to do is to pump out any toilet holding tank that may well be on one side. Gas bottles also tend to be stored off centre so adjusting their size and position of the full or empty one may help. If it is a narrow boat and it has a separate cabin bilge then it is vital that you locate or cut an inspection hatch at the back of the cabin area. I suspect one will be under the rear steps or in the cupboard that is mounted against the back bulkhead. You may find this bilge has collected a lot of water. Ignore this if the cabin bilge runs into the engine room bilge. If none of this helps then you will have to get hold of some (usually) steel weights of thick steel offcuts. You may well be bale to place these on the "shelf" that is above the swim on the port side of the engine. Position it as close to the hull side as possible. If you decide to use lead then isolate it from the steel hull with thick plastic, rubber or zinc strips otherwise there is a theoretical chance of galvanic corrosion between the lead and steel - the steel being eaten away. Regrettably I can not say much more with the info you have given me. Please note that I am hearing that a certain well known, national hire company has fitted baffles into its holding tanks and on at least one secondhand boat it has proved impossible to fully evacuate the tank until the contents on both sides of the baffle were totally removed manually. I hear a kitchen ladle had to be used! Tony Brooks

paganman
paganman

Posted: Fri Sep 19, 2008 2:51pm

Post Subject: Listing

Sorry Tony I wasn't very helpful was I! My boat is a 58 foot Harborough marine ex hire boat. The boat sits with the Bow higher than the stern so I assume any balast would be better in the bow to corect the list? I emptied the septic tank to see if this would make a difference but it didnt!

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Sat Sep 20, 2008 6:49pm

Post Subject: Listing

No worries Ivan - now we know what we are dealing with. IF your boat has a side passage I suspect no one thought to underbalast the side opposite the passage. Also, over the years a stove or calorifier may have been added to one side without adjusting the ballast. As long as I could check the cabin bilge for water (if its not an all in bilge) I would not worry about a small list. I think most holding tank boats do it when the tank is full. Harborough boats tend to have along front cockpit so you may well be able to get access to fit the extra ballast at the front, but it needs to be as far away from the centre line as you can get it. You will also find that you may alter the boat's pivot point towards the front. This may not be to your liking. I know I found my boat was easier to handle when I ballasted the stern down by about half an inch. I feel most boats are deliberately trimmed down by the stern a bit and unless I see a Harborough boat on the hard I suspect it is built with a very high front end rather than be riding high in the water. Tony Brooks

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