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AuthorMessage
rgrobinson
rgrobinson

Posted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 11:57am

Post Subject: Hull thickness

Hello,i am currently looking at various narrowboats with a view to eventually buying a liveaboard.I recentley looked at a boat that seems very suitable for my needs,it has plenty of equipment and the price is in my range.It was built in 2005,the hull thickness is listed as 8,6,5mm.Most boats ive looked at have a hull thickness of 10mm,how important is this and is it something i need to consider before making an offer? Thanks Richard

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 1:52pm

Post Subject: Hull thickness

Dear Richard, Many boats were built with 6mm bottom plates and after years of service in hire fleets continue in private use. Some only had 4 or 5mm base plate and/or hull sides but are still in use. The boast I refer to are probably over 30 years old new so the 8mm base plate taken in isolation should not be a reason for rejecting the boat. However you will have to accept a boat with an 8mm base plate will always attract a lower price than a similar one with a 10mm base plate. Of far more importance is how the boat has been looked after and used. If it has only ever had 12 volt electrics on board then I suspect you will have only lost perhaps 0.5mm off the base plate. If it has been used with a shoreline if might be getting on for perforated. If it is the boat for you make an offer, in writing, clearly saying SUBJECT TO SURVEY and that your deposit is returnable if the sale falls through. Then commission a survey so you minimise the chances of later finding the base plate is excessively thin or pitted. Even if the surveyor finds thin plates you should be able to negotiate the price down to pay for what is known as overplating. Tony Brooks

rgrobinson
rgrobinson

Posted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 4:28pm

Post Subject: Hull thickness

Thanks for your reply and advice,i'll certainly follow your advice. Thanks Richard

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