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Jeffrice
Jeffrice

Posted: Mon May 11, 2009 3:52pm

Post Subject: Narrowboat Blacking

Hi there, I'm about to black my boat. It's 5 years old, I don't think it's been blacked since new (I've just bought it recently). It has a couple of spots where rust has formed patches. What do you recommend as the ideal blacking proceedure. Thanks, Jeff

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Mon May 11, 2009 6:22pm

Post Subject: Narrowboat Blacking

Dear Jeff, The "ideal" blacking procedure will depend upon who you are talking to. I have yet to be convinced that two pack blacking products so I would not give the same advice as someone who is so convinced. I can not tabulate my answer on the forum so you will have to sort out where each item ends and another begins. 1. Find out what type of blacking is already on the hull. Damp a rag in white spirit or petrol (take care with the fumes and flammability) and clean any dirt off a small area to the blacking. Take a clean rad which has also been damped in the same stuff and rub the blacking. If the rag turns dark brown of black then the fluid has dissolved the blacking which indicates it is probably bitumen based. If the rag remains fairly clean you probably have tar based blacking (note the word probably). 2. Find a compatible blacking with the same base (tar or bitumen) that you are happy with. Note - It is said bitumen blacking will go over tar but not the other way round. 3. Slip the boat and pressure-wash the whole hull before the growth below the waterline dries off. Use an industrial pressure washer to give maximum sustained pressure. This will remove all the loose blacking and most of the rust scale. 3. Grind (not wire brush) the rusty areas. Ideally to bright metal but at least so there is no more lose rust. 4. At this point some people use a blacking compatible rust treatment or a blacking compatible primer. many do not bother. 5. When any primer you have used is completely dry apply the first coat of blacking taking great care to scrub it right into all the pits and scratches. If you use a roller to apply it go over it with a stiff brush to really scrub it into any pits. Allow to dry, do not cut corners any re-coat too quickly. 6. Apply a second coat, again paying attention to any pits and allow to dry. 7. You may then wish to apply a third coat all over or for (say) six inches above and below the waterline. Often it is left at two coats. 8. When dry re-float. 9. Think about all the dirty work and pay a boatyard to do it! Tony Brooks

Jeffrice
Jeffrice

Posted: Tue May 12, 2009 12:40pm

Post Subject: Narrowboat Blacking

Thanks once again Tony :)

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