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mikesden...
mikesden...

Posted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 8:27am

Post Subject: heating and hot water

We have just bought a 45ft sailaway and was wondering what is the best way to provide hot water and heating

Tony-B...
Tony-B...

Posted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 8:56am

Post Subject: heating and hot water

Dear Denise, This is all about how you intend to use the boat (live aboard, long term cruising, holiday/weekend boat), your attitude to the dust associated with solid fuel stoves, the speed with which you want the heating available and how important significant you consider a. the initial cost and b. the running costs. Even then anything I say will, to a degree relate to my preferences. Please give the items above some thought and then let us know. I can then give you a much better answer. Tony Brooks

Tony-B...
Tony-B...

Posted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 8:58am

Post Subject: heating and hot water

PS. Should have included your ability to lift/move loads of about 20 to 25Kg. TB

mikesden...
mikesden...

Posted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 9:25am

Post Subject: heating and hot water

Hi Tony Thanks for your prompt reply.We intend to use the boat for long term cruising from May to August and wk ends during the winter. It would be good to have heat etc within about 30 mins and we are not too worried about costs, although not keen on solid fuel. Lifting is not a problem.

Tony-B...
Tony-B...

Posted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 9:43am

Post Subject: heating and hot water

Thanks, First of all the "main" hot water would be from the engine via a calorifier. Get the largest calorifier you can accommodate with at least two heating coils. The engine will use one coil (usually the bottom one) to heat the water in the calorifier. At least one heating system demand that you have a stainless steel calorifier so to avoid future problems it might be better to start off with a stainless steel one. Copper ones are probably cheaper though. Now the boat heating and water heating when the engine has not been run for 14 hours or so and/or when you have used up the hot water. You have a choice of diesel or gas. Unless you can accommodate a separate heating thank I can foresee extra aggravation with using diesel and claiming something different from the 60/40 duty split on the fuel so that would imply a gas boiler. I would choose an Alde, but it must not be used with copper plumbing. Gas is said to be more expensive but the latest Alde boilers are more efficient than their earlier models and they are reliable and easy to light. If you go for diesel and intend to run it on diesel then Personally I would avoid the "big three" makes of forced draught diesel heaters and that only leaves the make sold by a well known canal company. If you have a separate tank and can get a ready supply of 28 second heating oil then I think any of forced draught heaters can be chosen. The central heating output is fed through the other coil in the calorifier to heat the domestic water. I have chosen to ignore the drip feed diesel stoves and boilers because they will be slower to heat the water, but they do provide a focal point in a room providing you have enough chimney draught, but that can be a problem on boats because of a low chimney height. Tony Brooks

mikesden...
mikesden...

Posted: Sun Jul 19, 2009 9:56am

Post Subject: heating and hot water

Tony Many thanks for explaining and making sense. We can now move forward with a bit more confidence. many thanks Denise

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