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valeriek
valeriek

Posted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 2:04pm

Post Subject: Exhaust on tidal waters

When we had the boat inspected for safety etc. we were told that the exhaust may be a problem if we entered tidal waters due to the angle it exited the hull. What can we do about this? We intend to enter the Thames at Brentwood and head towards Bristol this year.

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Fri Jan 22, 2010 6:20pm

Post Subject: Exhaust on tidal waters

Dear Valerie, I assume this is a narrow boat with a typical rear engine layout. A sea boat will have one or two swan necks to prevent waves pushing water into the engine. The swan neck sweeps up to just below deck height so waves hitting the stern of the boat have difficulty getting past the swan neck. However that is mainly for when they are moored with the engine off. Many narrow boat engines have their exhaust manifold below the water line and no swan neck so if a wave hit the back of the boat with the engine stationary water could well get inside the engine and do damage BUT:- The largest wave you are likely to encounter on your trip is from passing cruisers and not sea type waves. Your engine will be running and the exhaust flow will tend to keep the water out of the exhaust. Now, I can not tell you there is nothing to worry about but my boat used to have the exhaust perhaps 2" above the waterline in the side and now its in the rear. I have done the trip you mention (in reverse) three times. Twice entering the canal at Brentford and once at Limehouse. I did nothing to the exhaust. I hit larger waves from speeding cruisers on the Severn above Upton this year. If you are seriously thinking about tackling real salty lumpy stuff (Bristol channel etc.) get a threaded boss welded to the hull over the exhaust so you can screw on a plumber's elbow and vertical pipe. Otherwise my advice is to relax, enjoy BUT if you are moored somewhere where there are significant waves about bang a wooden bung into the exhaust - but remember to take it out when starting. Tony Brooks

valeriek
valeriek

Posted: Sat Jan 23, 2010 11:24am

Post Subject: Exhaust on tidal waters

Thanks for info. much appreciated. Sorry I forgot a few details! We have a 58ft. semi-trad narrow boat with rear engine having exhaust at side about 16" above waterline. Valerie

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