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jeanie...
jeanie...

Posted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 11:07am

Post Subject: suitable anchor for 58' narrowboat

We are preparing our 58 ft narrowboat for river use and would appreciate your advice and thoughts on choice of anchor. Are the folding anchors acceptable for 58' as storage is easier?

Tony-B...
Tony-B...

Posted: Sat Mar 27, 2010 7:02pm

Post Subject: suitable anchor for 58' narrowboat

Dear Dave, most narrowboats use what is generically known as a Danforth anchor. This looks like two tall right angle triangles of steel plate placed back to back against a central shaft to which the chain is attached. The two triangle are pivoted at the base and will fall open to form an angle of perhaps 20 to 30 degrees with the shaft. A typical one will stand about 2.5ft tall for a narrowboat. If this is what you mean by folding the yes it is acceptable. If you mean one of the folding "grappling hook" anchors all I can say is I would never trust one in anger. Any of the websites concerned with seafaring will tell you how to work out the anchor weight and the length of chain and rope required however they tend to have uncluttered front decks to work directly above the anchor AND winches. It is totally different with a narrowboat so any anchor you buy needs to of a weight that you can handle, especially with several meters of heavy chain attached. This will normally you have an underweight anchor according to the tables etc. but it is no good having an anchor you can not lift. One last thing. Please make sure the end of the rope is securely fixed to a very strong point on the boat. This is probably NOT a T stud or dolly. They have been known top break away under large forces. Tony Brooks

micktuner...
micktuner...

Posted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 5:26pm

Post Subject: suitable anchor for 58' narrowboat

dave as i spent my naval career as a seaman i can tell you that first of all the anchor is only there to hold the cable or chain and it is the weight of the chain that holds the craft. so as tony says it is the weight you need to be careful of and the other main thing is the river bed is normaly mud or silt so a normal anchor would not hold, i use a 56lb mud weight on a piece of rope

Tony-B...
Tony-B...

Posted: Sun Mar 28, 2010 8:06pm

Post Subject: suitable anchor for 58' narrowboat

I can not let it go if I see potentially lethal advice given. A typical narrowboater has no idea what type of bottom they are attempting to anchor in and I know on the Thames it varies form mud, through gravel to rock. I suspect much the same applies to any major river. Different designs if anchors are more effective on different bottoms. Plough anchors (CQR type and others) excel on mud and gravel because they actually plough themselves deeper and deeper into the bottom. However they are not so good on rock. My understanding is that the fisherman's anchor (the traditional anchor shape) are good on rock but bad on mud and gravel. It is horses for course and the Danforth anchor is possibly the best all rounder. I can see no difference between a 56lb mudweight and a 56lb anchor if you just drop it into mud EXCEPT a Danforth anchor will tend to plough itself in. If is now vital that anyone reading this thread goes on line and checks the veracity of this and the previous post. I am perfectly happy to be told I am wrong but there is still no way I would deploy a mudweight on the Thames tideway or even the upper river in fast flows and expect it to hold. A mudweight or anchor that will not dig in deployed from the front of the boat will turn the boat head to current (unless there is a gale blowing another way)and also slow the boat to allow the rudder to force the boat to an angle to the current. Then you may be able to ferry glide towards the bank. Tony Brooks

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