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AuthorMessage
Trisha
Trisha

Posted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 4:30pm

Post Subject: touching up boat blacking

I have several patches of rust on the side of my boat where it has rubbed this winter. On the blacked section not the coloured paint work. Can I 'sand' this down as for other paint work as in your May magazine and then use blacking rather than primer, undercoat ect? I seem to remember being told about a product called 'T-cut'? that one could paint on the bear metal or rust to seal it and prevent further rusting at that point. Is this a good idea and if so where can I obtain such a product?

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Thu Apr 15, 2010 5:51pm

Post Subject: touching up boat blacking

Dear Trisha, Tcut is a product used to remove the chalky film that forms on the paintwork after a number of years and it will not seal anything. There are any number of products sold as rust cures but I would not bother with any of them for use under blacking when touching up. Any modern boat will have a hull 6mm (1/4 inch) thick and it will take many tens of years to rust right through. My advice would be to wired brush the areas to remove the worst of the lose rust and then rough the area up with course emery paper or a grinding disk. Then apply a couple of coats of blacking. It is important that you establish what type of blacking has been used on the hull and then use one based on the same material. You must never try to put tar based blacking over bitumen based ones although old, well weathered tar might accept bitumen overcoating. Clean an area of blacking and then rub it with a cloth damped with petrol. If the rag remains clean you probably have tar or two pack based blacking. If the rag goes brown/black it is probably bitumen based. If you are intent on using a rust "cure" then either Vactan or Fertan seem to be well thought of. Either Google for suppliers or check out your local chandlers. Tony Brooks

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