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AuthorMessage
candron
candron

Posted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 5:43pm

Post Subject: WOOD AND MULTI FUEL STOVES FOR COOKING AND WATER HEATING

Oppinion and recommendations of the above for use in narrowboats

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Fri Jul 30, 2010 8:49pm

Post Subject: WOOD AND MULTI FUEL STOVES FOR COOKING AND WATER HEATING

Ask a number of boaters this question and you will find they probably recommend the stove they have. I find the Stovax Brunel I have on the boat very good. I also have a Hunter with a fancy dual fuel grate at home (boat sized) and the opposite seems to apply. Of far more importance than make is for you to understand the materials and what to expect. The ready availability of spares like door glasses close to the waterways is also important. Stoves tend to be made from cast iron or fabricated from mild steel boiler plate. If you go for a cast iron one you need to ensure the castings are of the best quality otherwise they tend to crack easily. Even good quality ones demand a slow build up of heat to minimise the thermal shock and give plenty of time for expansion to even itself out across the stove. This tends to rule out cheaper cast stoves. Even some well respected name have hit poor quality casting problems in the past. If a fire runs away a cast stove may well get red hot but it should not distort through heat. Boiler plate stoves can be fired up quickly because they do not tend to crack but if a fire ran away they may well distort and become useless. I think some stoves use parts made by both processes, often the sides, top and back in mild steel and the front and door in cast. Because you specify water heating it is important that you ensure the stove is not so large your radiators can not dump sufficient heat. Otherwise the water will boil, possibly showering you or a cupboard with rusty scalding water. Even with my Brunel one feels it is more comfortable to keep the rear doors open when it is going well because it gets so hot. Before going too far down this road it is vital that you obtain a copy of the new BS8511 (not the original draft) covering installing stoves in boats. The minimum distance from combustible material may severely limit your choice of stove. I must also point out the importance of both a fire and CO when a stove is fitted to a boat. At present I do not think BS8511 is covered by the BSS but failure to comply in a new installation just might give your insurance company wriggle room if the worst happened. Tony Brooks

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