Forums » Ask a Question

Use this forum to post your questions to our experts – you need to be logged on to do it (you can register here ), then scroll down to the bottom of this page and click the blue Post Thread words

If you can help answer the question, feel free to post a reply – you need to be logged on to do it (you can register here ), then hit the reply button on the thread.

 

To go back to the experts page click here>>

AuthorMessage
homer2911
homer2911

Posted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 9:27am

Post Subject: Tiller judder

Last year I grounded my skeg in a Thames lock, and when the boat was lifted out for repair it was found that the skeg had bent upwards, the tiller had lifted almost out of its socket, and the weld around the socket had fractured. Everything was straightened out and the weld repaired, but I now have an annoying judder at just about every engine speed. Previously I had a judder only at around 1100 rpm. The main tiller bearing was replaced only a couple of years ago and shows no sign of damage. Any ideas?

Tony-B
Tony-B

Posted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:14am

Post Subject: Tiller judder

Dear Don, As long as the repair was done in a competent manner I can only think of two possible causes. First of all if the skeg was pushed up enough so the rudder stock nearly lifted out of the skeg cup I feel there is a very good chance one blade of the propeller may have been distorted. This would cause uneven water flow from the prop so the flow hits the rudder in different places according to which blade produced the flow. Secondly, it is possible that before the accident there was sufficient stiffness in the rudder mechanism to damp minor vibrations but the repair may have removed the stiffness so now you feel the vibrations. It may also be worth checking the skeg is still on the centreline of the boat and not kinked sideways so the rudder is now offset to one side. If all is correct and the rudder blade itself is not bent then I am afraid things can get time consuming and expensive because there are several "cures" that may or may not work. Trimming a piece off the front of the balance section of the rudder blade (the bit in front of the stock), Moving the prop away from the rudder or towards it - choose! Lengthening or shortening the blade and so on. One must also remember that motoring too fast on shallow canals can cause rudder judder at low speeds. If it truly is not possible to live with the judder, and I think most tiller steered boats suffer from a degree of judder all the time they are moving, then the most cost effective solution would be to take the boat to a yard that seems to understand what you are talking about and can give a sensible explanation of what they intend to do and, most importantly, why. You stand more chance of solving it in one docking that way. Tony Brooks

homer2911
homer2911

Posted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:22am

Post Subject: Tiller judder

Many thanks for that very speedy and comprehensive reply - I do have every faith in the original repairer to get to the bottom of it, which he has promised to do as soon as I can get the boat to hi for docking

homer2911
homer2911

Posted: Tue Jan 04, 2011 10:22am

Post Subject: Tiller judder

Many thanks for that very speedy and comprehensive reply - I do have every faith in the original repairer to get to the bottom of it, which he has promised to do as soon as I can get the boat to hi for docking

Most Read

Newsletter Sign Up

Canal Boat monthly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy

Like us on Facebook



Follow us on Twitter

Cache: Disabled for this object  Total Queries: 43.  Total Objects: 162.  Total Unserialized: 3. Total Runtime: 0.54 seconds.