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pookie...
pookie...

Posted: Mon Apr 01, 2013 9:02am

Post Subject: New to the game

Hi, I have around £20,000 does anyone think I will be able to buy a good narrow boat for this amount? What are the most important things to look for when buying a narrow boat? I have thought about buying a shell and building my dream boat. Does anyone know of any good companies that would be able sell me one?? Thanks

Tony-B...
Tony-B...

Posted: Tue Apr 02, 2013 8:10am

Post Subject: New to the game

First of all I think that you need to spend a bit of time doing some internet research. You also need to tell us exactly what you intend to do with your boat. http://www.aqueductbrokerage.co.uk/index.php/she lls list shells from £19720.80. Aintree Boats who I thought would be a fair budget builder seems to have website problems so I can not get an indicative price. Lets work with the Aqueduct price. To that you have to add engine & gearbox - allow another £6000 to £10,000 pounds depending upon your choice. Then add the cost of insulation. Already you are way over budget and I bet that is only for a 40ft boat. This may be too small to live in. Next work out the cost of the moorings, insurance and license that you will require from the moment the hull hits the water. Say between £1300 and well over £5000 a year depending upon size of boat and mooring location. If that has not put you off next work out how long it will take you to fit out and the cost of any specialists you may need to employ like electricians. Take that time and triple it to get somewhere near a realistic time scale. Then work out how you will pay for all the timber, wiring, domestic equipment etc that you will need to complete the boat. If you do not build to the Recreational Craft Directive AND provide all the certificates and paperwork you may well have trouble selling the boat and if you have to within 5 years or more you will be committing an offence so could be prosecuted. Find the Recreational Craft Directive papers on the Hampshire County Council website and study them. Having given you all the downside it is fair to say very many people do fit-out their own boats but I suspect many also fail to finish it. Just throw away the rose colored glasses and take a very long hard ice cold look at such a project and then you will probably find it very satisfying. Oh, you do understand the requirements of the Boat Safety Scheme don't you. If you decide to buy secondhand you MUST set aside around £1000 for a survey. This includes getting the boat out of the water. You will almost certainly be looking at a 20 plus year old boat that will require four yearly insurance surveys (one company allows 30 years). There are many very nice 20+ year old boats about but by the same token there are many rubbish ones that are just waiting to trap the unwary. If you buy a rust bucket you could end up paying almost as much again to have the hull over-plated. Just take care, never believe anything the vendor or broker tells you, never accept promises from the vendor or broker and never take any "recent" survey that you are offered at face value. Certainly be very wary of private sales, especially if it is a cash transaction or if the internet is involved. My advice would be to take your time, visit many tens of boats that are for sale so you get an idea about what is around and at what price but for goodness sake leave your credit card and cheque book at home so you do not get talked or seduced into putting a deposit down on a boat early on in the process. Take care and you should end up with a nice but old boat. Tony Brooks

pookie...
pookie...

Posted: Tue Apr 09, 2013 6:18pm

Post Subject: New to the game

Sorry about the delay, Great so much information. To be honest I am looking for an answer to my living situation when I get back to the uk. I have seen a few boats on ebay and gumtree for under £20,000 that look alright for my computer (obviously i know they could be rubbish). I just like the idea of living on a boat adn thought it would be cheaper than getting on the property ladder. Thanks for your advice

Tony-B...
Tony-B...

Posted: Wed Apr 10, 2013 8:02am

Post Subject: New to the game

It is generally accepted that living on a boat is no cheaper than living ashore. However if you are willing to ignore the regulations you sign up to when you license your boat then it can be. However you then risk legal action against you that eventually could end in the boat being taken from you. Genuine residential moorings with security of tenure are very, very difficult to find and are generally very expensive. You will also be paying council tax either within the cost or as an extra. Blind eye turned type leisure moorings are cheaper but then you have no security and often do not allow you to use the address of your moorings/marina for post etc. Tony Brooks

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