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batman...
batman...

Posted: Mon Apr 15, 2013 8:56pm

Post Subject: anchor

Can anyone tell me the correct anchor for my narrowboat its a 55 foot

Tony-B...
Tony-B...

Posted: Tue Apr 16, 2013 7:25am

Post Subject: anchor

The totally correct answer to that is NO. In theory you need to select your anchor to suit the ground you are anchoring in but with narrowboats especially there are certain restraints re space to store the anchor so most people, including myself, use a Danforth type anchor because it will stand on end and store flat. Then there is the question of weight and you and your crews ability to handle it in the space available. There are various websites that tell you how heavy the anchor should be for the weight of the boat but they are mainly for sea-boats that probably present more resistance to tides and wind than a typical narrowboat at anchor. I think that if you followed their advice you would not be able to lift the anchor, especially when it has its chain attached. Sea-boats of 55 ft would almost certainly have an anchor winch. Then there is a question about the length of chain & rope. This depends upon the depth of water you are anchoring in but you will almost certainly not be using charts to tell you. The chain is very important because it converts an upward pull on the rope to a horizontal pull on the anchor. This helps the anchor get a grip. At a wild guess I would suggest between 5 and 10 metres of suitable chain (not something from the DIY sheds) plus maybe 20 to 30 metres of suitable rope BUT take the advice of the vendor. I would not get an anchor weighing more than 20 Kg and now I am much older would probably go for a 15 Kg one. This is down to the weight for manual lifting plus the restricted space to handle it on my boat. The fixing at the boat end is very important. I would avoid the T stud unless I was 100% sure the welds would hold against a very heavy snatch. It is far better to use a reinforced strong point in a bulkhead or the gunwale turn-down in the cockpit. The last thing you need is to have a T stud or dolly ping off in an emergency situation. Tony Brooks

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